Cor Fellows Program

Our top priority is to: 1) select emerging student leaders (sophomores and juniors in college) as Cor Fellows, 2) develop three primary competencies so they can change the world, and 3) prepare them to thrive as prosocial leaders in their social, educational, and eventually, work environment. Fellows will serve and benefit their college and surrounding community by leading and executing the implementation of school-based, kindness programs.  

The primary role of the Fellow will be to lead Actively Caring programming (watch our videos) by training college students at your school as “character coaches” who will train middle or high school students in their local schools.  Cor staff is outreaching to schools in your area to build partnerships, but we need student leaders who want to teach students how to care for others. Fellows will develop an actively-caring mindset, which may shift their career aspirations toward the non-profit sector. Also, they will earn a stipend to support their educational journey.

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE FELLOWS?

The three primary roles of a Cor Fellow are outreach, project management, and training of students.

 

             Elementary School

           Elementary School

                Middle School

              Middle School

                 High School

               High School

            College/ University

          College/ University


Intentionally developing prosocial, cultural and leadership competencies through every education level prepares students with the skills to succeed in life -- at school, home and eventually, at work. We envision more opportunities for students to use their prosocial strengths at work in a career of service towards others. We call this the "Student-to-Public Good" Pipeline.

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The deck is stacked toward certain career aspirations because of existing structures, resources, and pathways.  COR aims to open more opportunities for a career pathway of service.  Teach for America, Peace Corps, and military service are well-established pathways from college campuses, but more pathways are possible.

Imagine if we could help all U.S. students develop the life and career skills to flourish in the 21st century and possibly select a career of service to others.  Take Sarah -- she enters Kindergarten, her first elementary school classroom, and leaves the classroom for the last time as a college graduate after 16 years of schooling.  In that time, she amassed more than courses and degrees; she left with a value to serve others, the skills to help her friends and strangers, the experiences to interact well with all a diverse group of people. Imagine if these skills of caring were quantifiable to show measurable growth in social-emotional and leadership development.  What if there were more than skills and a value to serve but real pathways to begin a purpose-driven career as public servants or leaders of a civil society (e.g., nonprofit staff members or social entrepreneurs)? Careers of service exist and thus, our vision is to build a “School to Public Service” Pipeline. 


From Student to Education Advocate

I will always remember the first few times going into the classroom to teach AC4P to the students. I was confident in the material we had developed but I was still pretty nervous. I remember one of my fellow “coaches” trying to comfort me by saying, “Nerves are a good thing, it means you care about what we are doing.” I, to this day, after countless times being in the front of classrooms and leading groups of students, still get a nervous feeling just before beginning and it reminds me that AC4P led me to this career that I love doing today.
— Derek Cornwell

From Virginia Tech Student to Youth Development Coordinator

B.S. in Psychology, Virginia Tech (2012) 

M.S. in Community Psychology, University of New Haven (2014)

Derek's Service: Actively serving students by providing drug-prevention and character education programming for students in my community.